The Body’s Energy Centers


The Body’s Energy Centers.Energy Centers of the Body Eastern philosophy and medicine, originating in ancient India and China, has traditionally considered the structures of the body and the vital processes taking place within them as nothing. separable.


Their term is halfway between structure and function, and identifies certain entities of the human body that represent the flow of life energy and, in a way, the paths for the flow. This does not correspond to the anatomical structure recognized by Western science and medicine. The chakras are energy…

Eastern philosophy and medicine, originating in ancient India and China, have traditionally viewed body structures and the vital processes taking place within them as inseparable. Their term is halfway between structure and function, and identifies certain entities of the human body that represent the flow of life energy and, in a way, the paths for the flow. This does not correspond to the anatomical structure recognized by Western science and medicine.


The chakras are the energy centers of a person’s biological field and are responsible for the psychophysiological state as well as a number of organ groups. All vital functions of the human body are determined by the energy revolving around the chakras. They can be defined as ‘whirlpools for short’ and in Indian they are considered ‘blasts of energy’ or ‘wheels’.

Energy transformation occurs precisely at these centers. Life energy, along with blood, circulates throughout the meridians in the chakras and supplies all organs and systems of the human body.


When the circulation in these meridians is stagnant, the human body is prone to various disorders. A great prevention method, explicitly designed to combat such stagnation, is the Chi Gun, an ancient Chinese self-healing method for activating energy centers. Chi Gun teaches people to release their own energy by massaging specific areas that correspond to different chakras.


There are 9 chakras mentioned in the Vedic scriptures, of which seven are basic; 21 in the second circle and 21 in the third circle. According to the Vedis, there are several energy channels that lead to different locations of the chakras. Three of these channels are basic. The first, called “shushumna”, is hollow and concentrated in the spine.

Two other energy pathways, “ida” and “pingala”, are located on either side of the spine. These two channels are most active in most people, while “shushumna” remains stagnant.


The seven basic chakras rotate at a high rate in the bodies of healthy individuals, but slow down due to illness or age. When the body is in harmonious balance, the chakras remain partially open. The closed chakras cannot receive energy, which leads to various disorders.

The first base chakra, “Muladhara”, is located at the base of the spine in the coccyx region. Life energy, the heart of a strong and healthy immune system, is stored in this chakra. It is not possible for a person to fall ill, grow old, or even die before his vital energy reserves are exhausted.


The will to live is controlled by Muladhara. It is also responsible for bones and joints, teeth, nails, the urogenital system, and the large intestine. The first symptoms of a poorly functioning Muladhara are irrational fear, fainting, insecurity or confidence in the future, foot and leg problems, and intestinal disturbances.


Interrupted activity of the Muladhara chakra causes lack of energy, digestive problems, diseases of the bones and spine and nervous tension.

The second chakra, “Svadhistana”, is located at the level of the sacrum, three or four fingers below the navel. This chakra regulates the pelvis, kidneys, and sexual functions. We also feel the emotions of others through this chakra. Symptoms of faulty “Svadhistana” are kidney problems, cystitis, and arthritis.


The third chakra, “Manipura”, is found in the solar plexus area. This chakra is the center of storage and distribution of energy generated from digestion and breathing. It is responsible for vision, digestive system, liver, gallbladder, pancreas and nervous system. Symptoms of stagnant “Manipura” are as follows: increased and constant anxiety, as well as disorders of the stomach, liver and nerves.

The fourth chakra, “Anahata”, also known as the heart chakra, is located in the chest area. We create and receive love through this chakra. It is in charge of the heart, lungs, bronchi, hands and arms. Symptoms of stagnation include depression and cardiovascular imbalances.


The fifth chakra, “Vishudha”, is located at the throat level and is the center of analytical and logical skills. This chakra supports the skin, the organs of hearing, as well as the windpipe and lungs. Symptoms include emotional instability, cervical spine discomfort, sore throat, communication difficulties, and thyroid and esophageal conditions.


The sixth chakra, “Adjna”, is located between the eyebrows and is called the “third eye”. This is the throne of the human brain. “Regulating” the flow of energy to the head and pituitary gland and is also responsible for determining our harmonious development. If a person’s “third eye” is no longer functioning properly, mental impairment, headaches and migraines, earaches, olfactory problems, and psychological disturbances may be noticed.

The seventh chakra, “Sahasrara”, is located at the top of the head and represents the crest where an individual’s energy fluctuates with the highest frequency. It is considered the spiritual center and entrance to the body for cosmic energy. A stagnant “Sahasrara” can lead to a decrease or lack of inner wisdom, as well as a lack of basic intuition.


With a basic knowledge of these first seven chakras, we can answer the question: “How do we use this information to determine the cause of our disorders and problems?” , and with the help of oriental medicine, learn to self-control the functions of the chakras . . . ? ”.
From the point of view of Eastern medicine, our health depends on the distribution of the information field of our energy consciousness.

The lack of energy will inevitably lead to evils. According to Tibetan medicine, the only difference between youth and old age, and between a sick and healthy person, is the difference in the speed of rotation of the energy centers of the whirlpool.